2014 Nissan 370Z Coupe

Pros: Invigorating acceleration, especially with NISMO model; incredibly agile handling; occupies an attractive price and performance point in between lower- and higher-priced sports cars

Cons: Cramped, low-slung cabin is difficult to enter and exit; poor rear visibility; stiff ride; a bit too high-strung for everyday use for some drivers

CG Says: Now six years into its product cycle with only minor changes year to year, the Nissan 370Z is starting to feel a bit long in the tooth. Still, this exhilarating two-seater offers an undiluted sports-car driving experience, and it continues to occupy a “sweet spot” niche in the enthusiast-car market. A 370Z is much more affordable than a Corvette, yet it offers substantially more power than cheaper rear-drive sporty cars such as the Mazda Miata and the Scion FR-S/Subaru BRZ duo. By some measures, the Base 370Z might seem expensive, but considering its invigorating all-around performance, it’s actually something of a bargain. The Base coupes strike us as the best 370Z value; Roadsters struggle to justify their relatively high price tags. The NISMO is for serious enthusiast drivers only; its handling is a notch above the standard 370Z, but its excessive noise and punishing ride are too overwhelming to make it suitable as a daily driver.

2014 Nissan 370Z Roadster
2014 Nissan 370Z Roadster
2014 Nissan 370Z NISMO
2014 Nissan 370Z NISMO