Compact SUV; Built in England
  • 4-door hatchback
  • transverse front-engine/front- or all-wheel drive
Good condition price range: $11,100 – $33,100*


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Front


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Rear


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Interior


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Profile


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Rear-2


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Interior-2


2011 Mini Cooper Countryman Front-2

Pros:
  • Acceleration (S models)
  • Handling
  • Customizable interior storage
  • Passenger and cargo room
Cons:
  • Passing power (base model)
  • Quietness
  • Ride quality (S models)

With this new four-door model, Mini brings its characteristic “go-kart” driving dynamics to the compact-SUV segment. Many thoughtful features, creative storage solutions, and customization options help it stand out in the compact-SUV crowd. Though it might not have the extra-tall ground clearance, sheer height, and high seating position of some competitors, the Countryman does offer fun-to-drive attributes, and Mini’s first AWD system. New-car pricing was similar to compact SUVs, but Minis are known to hold their value exceptionally well, so secondhand examples won’t be cheap.

Overview

The 2011 Mini Cooper Countryman was the latest addition to this brand’s lineup. Countryman was Mini’s first vehicle sold in the United States that had four full-size doors, and also the first to offer all-wheel drive. This wagon was a compact SUV that seated four. Like other Mini Cooper models, it came in Base and high-performance S models. All had standard front-wheel drive. Mini’s new “ALL4” all-wheel drive was available on the S model. Base versions used a 121-horsepower, 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine. S models got a turbocharged 181-horsepower, 1.6-liter four-cylinder. A six-speed manual transmission was standard, and a six-speed automatic was optional.

Standard safety features included all-disc antilock braking, traction control, an antiskid system, curtain side airbags, front side airbags, and a passenger knee airbag. The Countryman’s rear seats could slide fore and aft up to 5 inches to benefit either passenger or cargo room. Instead of a center console, Countryman had Mini’s “Center Rail” storage system, which extended through the front and rear passenger compartments. Center Rail included several removable storage bins, as well as cables for passengers to connect cell phones and MP3 players. Among the available features were a sport suspension, dual-panel panoramic sunroof, and adaptive xenon headlights. Also offered were several dealer-installed dress-up accessories. Note that Mini is owned by BMW. Although the Mini Countryman had no direct competitors, roughly comparable crossover SUVs included the Volkswagen Tiguan, Honda CR-V, Hyundai Tucson, and Toyota RAV4.

Yearly Updates

2012 Cooper Countryman
Little was new for the 2012 Mini Cooper Countryman.
2013 Cooper Countryman
The 2013 Mini Cooper Countryman received an unusual number of changes for such a young model. An interior update included a revised dashboard; redesigned audio controls and door panels; power-window switches moved from the center console to the doors; and (as a 2012-model running change) a standard 40/20/40 rear bench seat that replaced twin buckets, which continued as a no-cost option. Bluetooth connectivity was now standard too, while satellite radio shifted to the options list. Finally, the Countryman added a racy John Cooper Works edition.
2014 Cooper Countryman
There were only minor changes for the 2014 Countryman. Headed side mirrors and washer jets were now standard, and there were new optional John Cooper Works appearance packages.

Engines

transverse front-engine/front- or all-wheel drive

Like other Mini Cooper models, the Countryman came in two forms: regular and S, with two versions of the 1.6-liter four-cylinder engines. Base models got a 121-horsepower engine. Countryman S models held a turbocharged engine that developed 181 horsepower. The new-for-2013 John Cooper Works model had 208 horsepower. A six-speed manual transmission was standard on all variants, with six-speed automatic optional.

dohc I41
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 1.6/98
Engine HP 121
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 118
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
6-speed automatic
27/35
25/30
Turbocharged dohc I42
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 1.6/98
Engine HP 181
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 177
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
6-speed automatic
26/32
25/32
Turbocharged dohc I43
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 1.6/98
Engine HP 208
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 207
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
6-speed automatic
25/31
23/30

1. Countryman. 2. Countryman S. Countryman S ALL4 model’s EPA estimated fuel economy is 25/31 with manual transmission and 23/30 with automatic transmission. 3. Countryman John Cooper Works.

Road Test

Base models have decent acceleration from a stop, but lack passing reserves. S models with front-wheel drive exhibit some torque-steer wander, but still accelerate quickly. All-wheel-drive S models feel quickest from a stop. Turbo lag is apparent in all S models. No opportunity to test a Countryman John Cooper Works.

In Consumer Guide testing, the front-drive Countryman Cooper S with automatic delivered 28.2 mpg in mostly highway driving. In a more even mix of city and highway driving the result was 22.3 mpg. All Countryman models require premium-grade gas.

Ride quality depends on model. Base Countryman models filter out most bumps, and only large road imperfections are noticed. S versions ride rougher, and sharp bumps are particularly unsettling.

Handling has long been Mini’s strong suit. All Countryman variants deliver crisp steering and athletic handling. Strong, smooth brakes have a compliant pedal feel. Pressing the standard “Sport” button firms up steering feel and sharpens response. The antiskid system gently brings the car back in line during a skid, unlike some systems on other manufacturers’ vehicles that function more abruptly.

At city speeds, the Countryman is relatively docile, though the engine is always heard. On the highway, tire drone and wind noise from the side mirrors make for very strained conversation above 60 mph.

Like other Mini Coopers, the Countryman has a very large center-dash-mounted speedometer. Its placement forces drivers to divert their eyes from the road, though the tachometer incorporates an easy-to-see digital speedometer. Mid- and upper-level trim levels incorporate an infotainment-system screen into the center-mounted-speedometer. Rather than a touch screen, it’s controlled by a small knob in front of the shifter. That system controls navigation, audio, and phone functions. Additionally, a specialized application for connected Apple iPhones has a suite of infotainment options. On models equipped with the screen, the speedometer’s needle is replaced by a small red pointer, which can be difficult to see at a glance. The buttons on the central control panel are small and take a while to understand and use at a glance. As in other Mini vehicles, the interior is a mix of hard- and soft-touch plastics, all of which feel high-quality and are well-assembled. Cupholders are small and can eject anything bigger than small plastic water bottles. Interior illumination includes colored lights with adjustable hues in the door panels and center rail.

Front seats offer plenty of room for very tall drivers. Long seat tracks and a tilt/telescopic steering wheel help tailor an ideal driving position. The leather seats that have been available in all models are comfortable and do a good job of holding occupants in place around fast turns. Views to the sides and rear are good, thanks to large windows and big mirrors.

The rear seat has impressive headroom and legroom for 6-footers. Entry and exit are good unless front seats are pushed far back. Rear seats slide fore and aft, and their seat backs recline.

Countryman has an impressive amount of cargo room with the rear seatbacks up. The rear seatbacks fold, but don’t lay completely flat. Each Countryman has a cargo cover and large under-floor storage area. The load floor folds up and locks against the rear seatbacks to allow storage and hiding of larger items.

Ratings

Model Tested: 2011-12

Ratings values are on a 1-10 scale, with 10 being the best. With the exception of Value, these numbers reflect how the vehicle compares against the universe of vehicles, not just against rivals in its class.

Performance

Acceleration - 4
40%
Fuel Economy - 6
60%
Ride Quality - 5
50%
Steering/Handling - 6
60%
Quietness - 4
40%

Accommodations

Controls/Materials - 5
50%
Room/Comfort Front - 6
60%
Room/Comfort Rear - 6
60%
Cargo Room - 6
60%

Other

Value - 7
70%

Total: 55

Specifications

4-door hatchback
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
102.2 161.7 70.4 61.5
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
41 12.4 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
39.9 37.5 40.4 33.8
Safety Ratings

Model Tested: 2011 Not tested 4-door hatchback

NHTSA

(5 is the highest rating)

Front Impact Test

Driver Injury - N/A
N/A0%
Front Passenger Injury - N/A
N/A0%

Side Impact Test

Driver Injury - N/A
N/A0%
Rear Passenger Injury - N/A
N/A0%

HLDI

(A score of 100 is average. Lower is better)

Collision N/A
Injury N/A
Theft N/A

Trouble Spots

Oil leak
Description: Engine oil may leak from the oil pump solenoid, but travel down the electrical harness making it hard to locate. (2011-12)
Oil leak
Description: Engine oil may leak from the timing chain tensioner due to a weak O-ring. (2011-12)
Electrical problem
Description: Various electrical items may quit working and, in rare cases, the engine may not start due to a bad 100-amp fuse in the rear distribution box requiring replacement of the whole box. (2011-12)

Recall History

2011 Countryman S
Description: Electronic circuit board for the electric auxiliary water pump that controls the turbocharger might malfunction and overheat, which could result in fire.

Equipment Lists

Equipment lists are only viewable on larger screen sizes.

Pricing

Used-car pricing varies widely depending on local market conditions. Therefore, we recommend visiting websites that list used cars for sale to get a better idea of what a specific model is selling for in your area.