Premium sporty/performance car; Built in Germany
  • 2-door convertible
  • 2-door coupe
  • longitudinal rear-engine/rear- or all-wheel drive
Good condition price range: $14,500 – $180,000*


2001 Porsche 911 Carrera 2-door coupe


2000 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 2-door coupe


2001 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet


2001 Porsche 911 Turbo 2-door coupe


2001 Porsche 911 Turbo 2-door coupe


2001 Porsche 911 Carrera interior

Pros:
  • Acceleration
  • Build quality
  • Exterior finish
  • Steering/handling
  • Brake performance
Cons:
  • Cargo room
  • Control layout
  • Entry/exit
  • Noise
  • Rear-seat room/comfort

A 911 is relatively practical for a high-performance sports car, though BMW’s Z3-based M roadster and coupe, and the Porsche Boxster, deliver similar thrills for fewer dollars. Not for everyone, the 911 produces a unique high-performance driving experience. Sure, you pay plenty for the privilege, but iconic status makes any 911 a virtual no-lose long-term investment. Because resale values are exceptionally high, prices are lofty on the used-car market.

Overview

After some 34 years of continuous improvements of its original design, Porsche’s legendary rear-engine 911 was redesigned as an early 1999 model. About 7 inches longer than its predecessor, the new 911 was an inch wider, on a wheelbase 3 inches longer than before.

Continuing 911 tradition, the “flat” (horizontally opposed) six-cylinder engine was mounted in the rear, but it underwent considerable change. In addition to switching from air cooling to water cooling, the engine had dual-overhead cams rather than a single-cam configuration, with four valves per cylinder instead of two. Essentially, it was a 3.4-liter version of the engine used in the smaller Boxster, producing 296 horsepower–more than the prior 3.6-liter.

Considered the “classic” Porsche, the 911 Carrera first came in 2+2 coupe form with rear-wheel drive. Cabriolet convertibles and Carrera 4 models (with all-wheel drive) joined later.

A six-speed manual transmission was standard. Porsche’s five-speed automatic transmission, which offered “Tiptronic S” operation using manual-shift buttons on the steering wheel, was an option.

Antilock four-wheel disc brakes were standard, as were side-impact airbags. As before, the coupe’s back seat was a tiny, minimally useful feature.

To a large extent, the 911 was in a class of its own, but rivals included the Acura NSX, BMW Z3 series and more costly Z8, Chevrolet Corvette, and Mercedes-Benz SL-Class. A satellite-based navigation system was optional.

Yearly Updates

2000 911
The 911’s six-cylinder engine gained 4 horsepower this year. Porsche’s Stability Management antiskid system was standard on the all-wheel-drive Carrera 4, and newly available as an option for the rear-drive Carrera 2. The system was designed to apply individual brakes as needed, to counteract skids in turns.
2001 911
Porsche revived the Turbo coupe as an early 2001 model, with a twin-turbo 3.6-liter engine that produced 415 horsepower. For the first time, Turbos could be equipped with an automatic transmission.
Carreras kept the 3.4-liter engine. Turbo 911s featured bolder front/rear styling, standard 18-inch wheels (versus 17s on Carreras), and a “biplane” rear spoiler designed to enhance high-speed stability.
2002 911
Revised styling and more power arrived for 2002. Base models switched from a 3.4-liter engine to a 3.6-liter, rated at 320 horsepower rather than 300. Also new for 2002 was the GT2, essentially a rear-drive Turbo with a 456-hp engine, special suspension, and fewer standard luxuries–all aimed at lowering weight and increasing performance. The GT2 also introduced the industry’s first Ceramic Composite brakes.
Interior materials were upgraded this year, front seatbelt pretensioners were installed, and convertibles switched from plastic to glass for the back window. All models except the GT2 got an optional navigation system and five-speed automatic transmission.
2003 911
Optional “Horsepower Kits” boosted the base engine to 345 hp and the turbo to 450 hp. Standard audio system exchanged its cassette player for a single-disc in-dash CD player. Arriving late in the year was the GT3, a $99,900 rear-drive model with a 380 hp nonturbo engine.
2004 911
Porsche’s trademark sports car offered an expanded model lineup for 2004. New were the 40th Anniversary Carrera coupe, a Cabriolet version of the Turbo, and a new model called the GT3. The 40th Anniversary model has unique interior and exterior styling, upgraded suspension and 345 horsepower. The GT3 sports 380 horsepower, a lightened body, and special aerodynamics. The GT2 gained revised suspension tuning and 21 horsepower, now 477.
2005 911
The 911 lineup for 2005 blended redesigned rear-wheel-drive models with carryover all-wheel-drive models. All had a rear-mounted, horizontally opposed 6-cyl engine. The redesigned 2005 models were available as coupes and convertible Cabriolets. Compared to the carryover models, the redesigned coupe and convertible had subtly altered styling and dimensions and a revamped interior. The redesigned Carreras introduced additional side airbags that deployed from the windowsills for head protection.
2006 911
The midyear return of a turbocharged model made news for Porsche’s flagship sports car lineup. Turbos were launched as 2007 models and were AWD coupes.
2007 911
Porsche’s flagship car revived glass-roof Targa coupes for 2007. The new Targa 4 and 4S were AWD coupes with a 4.8-sq-ft power-sliding roof panel made of translucent glass.
2008 911
The 2008 Porsche 911 added a turbocharged convertible model to its roster but was otherwise unchanged.
2009 911
The 2009 Porsche 911 Carrera and Targa were substantially revised, with slightly freshened styling, more power, and a new automatic transmission. The 2009 Porsche 911 Turbo and GT2 models were largely unchanged. Carrera and Targa 4 versions used a 3.6-liter engine with 345 hp, an increase of 20 from 2008. Carrera S and Targa 4S versions used a 3.8 making 385 hp, an increase of 30 hp from 2008. All Carrera models offered a new 7-speed automatic transmission.
2010 911
The 2010 Porsche 911 lineup gained updated track-ready GT3 and GT3 RS as well as a new Turbo variant. The 911 Turbo got a new 500-horsepower 3.8-liter turbocharged motor.
2011 911
The 2011 Porsche 911 lineup added the Carrera GTS and Carrera Speedster convertible, both with rear-wheel drive and a 408-hp version of the 3.8-liter flat six.

Engines

longitudinal rear-engine/rear- or all-wheel drive

Until 2001, the 911 came with a 3.4-liter horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine that developed 296 or 300 horsepower. Turbo models got a 3.6-liter, rated at 415 hp. In 2002, the base engine grew to 3.6 liters and 320 hp, and the new GT2 got a 456-hp version. A 6-speed manual transmission was standard, with 5-speed automatic optional on regular 911s–and starting in 2001, also on the Turbo. For ’03 Porsche offered optional “Horsepower Kits” that boosted the base engine to 345 hp and the turbo to 450 hp. Turbos returned in the middle of 2006 as ’07s with 480 horsepower. For 2009, Carrera and Targa 4 versions used a 3.6-liter engine with 345 hp, an increase of 20 from 2008. Carrera S and Targa 4S versions used a 3.8 making 385 hp, an increase of 30 hp from 2008. All Carrera models offered a new 7-speed automatic transmission. For 2010, the 911 Turbo got a new 500-horsepower 3.8-liter turbocharged engine. Added in 2011 was a GTS coupe and Speedster with a 408-horsepower 3.8

dohc H6
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.4/207
Engine HP 296-300
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 258
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
5-speed automatic
17/25
16/25
dohc H6
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.6/219
Engine HP 315-320
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 273
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
5-speed automatic
18/26
18/26
dohc H6
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.8/233
Engine HP 355-385
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 295-310
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
7-speed automatic
5-speed automatic
18/25
19/26
17/24
dohc H6
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.6/219
Engine HP 380
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 284
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual

15/23

dohc H6
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.8/233
Engine HP 408
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 310
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
7-speed automatic
18/25
19/26
Turbocharged dohc H6
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.6/220
Engine HP 415
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 413-415
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
5-speed automatic
15/22
15/22

Road Test

Simply put, the 911 is a high-performance sports car of the first rank. Not only are 911s tops in handling, but they’re mighty quick–and smooth. Porsche claimed a 0-60 mph acceleration time of 4.2 seconds for the Turbo. Standard Carrera models also produce plenty of excitement, roaring off the line strongly and smoothly, reaching 60 mph in 5.6 seconds.

A very firm ride is part of the 911 package, but steering is confident and communicative–though the nose of one test Carrera convertible wandered a bit during hard acceleration and in crosswinds. We averaged 20.8 mpg with a Carrera convertible, versus 17.2 mpg in a Carrera coupe, both with manual shift.

Engine and tire noise intrude on normal conversation at higher speeds, but that’s true of most cars in this league. Controls and gauges might seem logical to ardent Porsche fans, but anyone unfamiliar with the 911 is likely to find them unusual at first–including ignition-key position and the big tachometer that sits directly ahead of the driver. Interiors are roomy for two, but front seatbacks are too narrow for some occupants. Entering and exiting the front seat takes some squirming, but isn’t as difficult as some sports cars. Don’t even think about the back seat, which is suitable for small children at best. Cargo space also is minimal, and the convertible’s plastic back window (until 2002) was inexcusable at this car’s price.

Ratings

Model Tested: 2001 Porsche 911 Carrera coupe

Ratings values are on a 1-10 scale, with 10 being the best. With the exception of Value, these numbers reflect how the vehicle compares against the universe of vehicles, not just against rivals in its class.

Performance

Acceleration - 8
80%
Fuel Economy - 4
40%
Ride Quality - 3
30%
Steering/Handling - 10
100%
Quietness - 3
30%

Accommodations

Controls/Materials - 3
30%
Room/Comfort Front - 4
40%
Room/Comfort Rear - 1
10%
Cargo Room - 2
20%

Other

Value - 2
20%

Total: 40

Specifications

2-door convertible
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
92.6 174.5 69.5 51.4
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
11.7 16.9 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
38.0 Na 41.6 NA
2-door coupe
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
92.6 174.5 69.5 51.4
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
11.7 16.9 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
38.0 NA 41.6 NA
Safety Ratings

Model Tested: N/A

NHTSA

(5 is the highest rating)

Front Impact Test

Driver Injury - N/A
N/A0%
Front Passenger Injury - N/A
N/A0%

Side Impact Test

Driver Injury - N/A
N/A0%
Rear Passenger Injury - N/A
N/A0%

HLDI

(A score of 100 is average. Lower is better)

Collision N/A
Injury N/A
Theft N/A

Trouble Spots

Clutch
Description: The clutch pedal may return slowly or incompletely due to loose clip on hydraulic line. (1999-04)
Doors
Description: The door may not open from the inside because the cable between the handle and release breaks. (1999-2000)
Engine misfire
Description: The pressure hose between the turbo and intercooler can come loose, causing significant loss of power. (2001)
Fuel gauge
Description: Erroneous fuel-gauge readings and/or problems during refueling may be due to the rubber fuel line inside the tank interfering with the sending unit or filler neck flap. (1999)
Keyless entry
Description: The remote keyless entry fob may quit working if repeatedly attempting to unlock the door from too great a distance requiring resynchronization with vehicle. (2005-07)
Spark plugs
Description: Fouled spark plugs cause hard starting or no-starts, requiring plugs with a hotter heat range. (2001)
Convertible top
Description: The convertible top may not close due to a problem with one of the microswitches in the lift mechanism. (1999-2000)
None
Description: There was a dealer campaign to replace the air cleaner housing because it did not fit snugly enough. (2004)
Transmission problems
Description: May be unable to shift into reverse (manual transmission) due to misadjusted cable linkage. (2004-06)
Transmission problems
Description: The transmission may go into limp-in mode and manual shifting will not work, but all return to normal after switching the key off and on is fixed by replacing the PDK control unit. (2009)

Recall History

1999-00
Description: Incorrect programming of the electronic logic unit can cause incorrect fuel level. The vehicle could run out of fuel and lose power.
2001
Description: The clutch-pressure line could leak in the area of its connection with the clutch cylinder, reducing clutch and steering power assistance.
2001
Description: The fuel-supply line could leak due to chaffing with the intake manifold.
2003 Carrera/GT2/Targa/Turbo
Description: The front seat backs on certain vehicles may not meet strength standards, making them dangerous in a crash. Dealers will inspect and replace affected parts.
2008 911 GT3
Description: The switch console for the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and traction control (TROFF) switches was installed inappropriately, and can cause an inadvertent change in suspension settings or deactivation of the traction control, even though the switches haven’t been actuated.
2008 911 GT3 RS
Description: The switch console for the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) and traction control (TROFF) switches was installed inappropriately, and can cause an inadvertent change in suspension settings or deactivation of the traction control, even though the switches haven’t been actuated.
2010 911 GT3
Description: Rear-wheel hubs may fail, resulting in loss of vehicle control.
2010-2011 911 Turbo, Turbo S, GT3, GT3 RS, GT2 RS
Description: Over time the hubs can wear prematurely. As the hubs wear, the wheels could loosen, increasing the risk of a crash.
2011 911 Speedster/911 GTS RS 4.0
Description: There is a possibility that the mounting holes in the seat belt anchor plates fitted to the vehicle are too small. If the hole diameter is too small, the anchor plate may not be able to rotate about the fastening bolt as designed. Should this occur, the seat belt may not be routed optimally around the occupant, or may potentially loosen at some point in the future.

Equipment Lists

Equipment lists are only viewable on larger screen sizes.

Pricing

Used-car pricing varies widely depending on local market conditions. Therefore, we recommend visiting websites that list used cars for sale to get a better idea of what a specific model is selling for in your area.