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  • longitudinal rear-engine/rear- or all-wheel drive
Good condition price range: $46,300 – $155,300*


2014 Porsche 911 50th Anniversary Edition


2014 Porsche 911 50th Anniversary Edition


2014 Porsche 911 GT3


2014 Porsche 911 50th Anniversary Edition

Pros:
  • Acceleration
  • Build quality
  • Steering/handling
Cons:
  • Price
  • Rear-seat room and comfort

The Porsche 911 is an absolutely thrilling car to drive. Precise handling, exceptional craftsmanship, and an intoxicating engine are all hallmarks. Unfortunately, so are stratospheric prices. Few automobiles of any stripe, though, can blend daily-driver livability and supercar handling the way the 911 can.

Overview

Something old, something new. Model-year 2012 marked the debut of a redesigned 911 Carrera coupe and Cabriolet. These new 911s became known to enthusiasts as the “991” generation cars, using the three-digit code the company assigned to the car’s all-new chassis. Though the new 911s didn’t look much different than their predecessors, these sports cars came with more power and the promise of increased fuel efficiency. These 911s were also the world’s first cars to come with a 7-speed manual transmission.

In 2012, these updates only applied to the rear-wheel drive 911 Carrera and Carrera S coupe and Cabriolet. All other 911s for 2012 continued on the previous-generation “997” platform with only minor trim changes. Porsche continued a gradual rollout of more redesigned 911 variants throughout calendar 2012 and 2013.

As mentioned above, the rear-wheel-drive 911 Carrera coupe and Cabriolet were new. These “base” models were joined for 2012 by the similarly redesigned, but more-powerful Carrera S coupe and Carrera S Cabriolet.

Other rear-drive 2012-model 911s included the Carrera GTS and GT2 RS. Porsche produced many all-wheel drive 911s as well. That lineup consisted of the following: Carrera 4, Carrera 4S, Carrera 4 GTS, Targa 4, Targa 4S, Turbo, and Turbo S. All but the Targa were offered as either a coupe or Cabriolet. Targas had a panoramic, power-sliding glass roof panel. The 911 GT3 and GT3 RS have been discontinued. Remember though, in 2012 these cars all continued to use the previous-generation “997” designs. Reviews of those models are found in Consumer Guide’s report on the 1999-2011 Porsche 911s.

For a high-end sports car, the 911 didn’t include a whole lot of standard amenities. There was the usual complement of power windows and locks, remote keyless entry, a Bluetooth wireless cell-phone link, and automatic climate control. Many desirable performance, luxury, and convenience features were optional, either as part of a package or a la carte. Their availability and pricing also depended on the specific model selected.

On the performance side, you could order the Sport Chrono Plus Package, which included a dashboard chonometer, sport button that electronically changed the engine and chassis for high-performance driving, and separate adjustments for the lighting, air conditioning, windshield wipers, and door locks. Some versions of this package also included special engine mounts and launch control, which adjusted the various electronic systems for maximum acceleration. A sport exhaust made the engine breathe easier and sound meaner. Porsche Torque Vectoring automatically distributed driving force between the rear wheels (this feature is not offered on AWD models). Carbon-ceramic-composite disc brakes were designed to offer greater stopping power and control.

Optional luxuries included full leather upholstery, power front seats, heated front seats, ventilated front seats, heated steering wheel, adaptive sport seats, navigation system, and voice recognition.

Convenience items you would expect to be standard but actually cost extra included a 6-disc CD changer, satellite radio, and steering-wheel radio controls.

All 911s used horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engines. The redesigned rear-drive Carrera and Carrera S had brand-new engines. The former used a 350-horsepower 3.4-liter unit while the latter received a 400-horsepower 3.8. Both came standard with an industry-first 7-speed manual transmission. Optional was a 7-speed “PDK” dual-clutch automated manual that behaved just like an automatic; it included steering-wheel paddles for manual gear changes.

EPA estimated fuel economy for the new 911 Carrera is 20 mpg city/28 mpg highway with the 7-speed manual transmission and 19 city/27 highway with the automated manual. Both figures apply to the coupe and convertible. The new Carrera S coupe scores 20 city/27 highway with the 7-speed manual and 19 city/27 highway with the automated manual. Convertibles are 19/27 regardless of transmission. Premium-grade gasoline was required.

Yearly Updates

2012 911
For 2013, Porsche introduced all-wheel drive Carrera 4 and 4S versions of the redesigned 911. All the carryover “997” models including the Turbo and Targa variants were discontinued.
2013 911
The 911 lineup expanded considerably for 2014. The Turbo and Turbo S models were back, as was the Targa. All Turbo and Targa variants came with standard all-wheel drive. Enthusiasts also rejoiced when the track-ready GT3 reappeared, even if the expected manual transmission was nowhere to be found. There was also a new limited-production, specially trimmed 50th Anniversary model to help celebrate the model’s 50th birthday.

Engines

longitudinal rear-engine/rear- or all-wheel drive

All 911s have a horizontally opposed 6-cylinder engine. “Base” Carreras had a 350-horsepower 3.4-liter motor. The Carrera S had a 400-horsepower 3.8. The available Power Kit increased that to 430. The GT3 came with a 475-horsepower 3.8. The 911 Turbo had a twin-turbocharged 3.8 that was rated at 520 horsepower. The Turbo S raised that to 560 ponies. The Carrera, Carrera 4, Carrera S, and Carrera 4S come standard with a 7-speed manual transmission. Porsche’s “PDK” transmission, a 7-speed dual-clutch automated manual that behaves like an automatic, was optional on Carrera, Carrera 4, Carrera S, and Carrera 4S, and standard on GT3, Turbo, and Turbo S.

dohc H61
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.4/207
Engine HP 350
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 287
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
7-speed manual
7-speed automated manual
19/27
20/28
dohc H62
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.8/232
Engine HP 400
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 325
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
7-speed manual
7-speed automated manual
19/27
1927
dohc H63
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.8/232
Engine HP 475
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 324
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
7-speed automated manual

15/20

Turbocharged dohc H64
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.8/232
Engine HP 520
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 487
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
7-speed automated manual

17/24

Turbocharged dohc H65
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 3.8/232
Engine HP 560
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 516
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
7-speed automated manual

17/24

1. Carrera, Carrera 4. MPG for Carrera 4 Cabriolet with manual transmission is 19/26, and 20/27 with automated manual. 2. Carrera S, Carrera 4S. MPG for Carrera 4S with manual transmission is 18/26, and 19/26 with automated manual. 50th Anniversary model and cars with optional Power Kit have 430 horsepower. 3. GT3. 4. Turbo. 5. Turbo S.

Road Test

The 911 Carrera S is an amazingly fast car. Porsche says rear-drive models will do 0-60 mph in 4.1 seconds (3.9 with the available Sport Chrono Plus Package). While we’ve not timed it, it feels every bit that quick. The “PDK” automated-manual transmission changes gears with lightning-quick speed. It’s enjoyable both on the street and on the racetrack. The all-wheel-drive Carrera 4S feels as fast, especially above 3,000 rpms. With the 7-speed manual, the clutch is very smooth. We had mixed opinions about the shifter though. Half our testers thought it was great. The rest found they needed a bit more time to acclimate to it, the most common gripe being getting a different gear than the one they intended. An engine-idle stop/start system is standard. It isn’t very smooth in operation, but it can be turned off.

In Consumer Guide testing, a Carrera S with the automated manual averaged 21.3 mpg. A Carrera 4S Cabriolet with the 7-speed manual returned 20.0 mpg. These are great results for a high-performance car. All 911s require premium-grade gasoline.

The 911 rides about as well as you can expect from a car with a firm suspension, short wheelbase, and low-profile tires. Moderate bumps are absorbed quite well, particularly with the suspension set in the default Normal setting. A 911 can be a bit jarring over bad pavement however. There’s no difference between rear- and all-wheel-drive models.

Grippy, balanced, stable. In other words, handling is everything you expect from a Porsche, and more. The optional active suspension includes enhancements that are really only apparent on a racetrack. If that’s your thing, great, but we’d otherwise leave that option box unchecked.

In the grand scheme of autodom, the 911 is not what you would call a “quiet” car. The noises it does make, though, are pretty spectacular…for the most part. The only thing we take minor issue with is the very rough engine note when the car is started from cold. The coupe’s cabin is rather well isolated, but even top-up, convertibles let in a bit more outside noise. Wind and road noise are not excessive for the class. The tires drone on anything but glass-smooth pavement.

911’s gauges are in a bit of an unconventional layout, putting the tachometer directly in front of the driver, with the speedometer off to the left. Fortunately, there is a redundant digital readout in the pod with the tach. The central touchscreen absorbs most audio functions, with decent results. The buttons that are there are logically arranged, but some testers had difficulty understanding even basic radio controls. Owners would likely acclimate quickly though. The navigation system is harder to program than necessary.

Some might criticize the cabin for not being high-end enough for a car whose sticker price can easily exceed $100,000. Not us. It strikes a great balance between sports-car purposeful and country-club opulence. Materials quality is top notch, with high-grade leather and beautifully textured plastics. Assembly quality on the models we’ve tested has been superb.

Getting in and out of the 911 isn’t easy, which you have to expect of a car that sits so close to the ground. Once you’re situated, headroom and legroom up front are just fine, even for the very tall. The seats are quite firm, but supportive in every way they need to be. In top-up convertibles, it is nearly impossible to see what’s behind you when trying to back out of parking spaces and such. We strongly recommend springing for the optional obstacle detection systems. A rearview camera would be better still, but Porsche doesn’t offer one on the 911.

There is a back seat, but it’s pretty much that in name only. One thing you can do is fit a rear-facing child safety seat, provided you have the front-passenger seat moved all the way forward. The seat backs flip forward to create a padded parcel shelf as well.

The front cargo area is deep from top to bottom but not front to back. It can hold a week’s worth of groceries or a couple pieces of soft luggage. This is where the folding rear seat backs can come in handy. Interior storage is very poor. The center console and expanding door pockets offer only minimal space.

Ratings

Model Tested: 2012 Carrera S coupe, automated manual

Ratings values are on a 1-10 scale, with 10 being the best. With the exception of Value, these numbers reflect how the vehicle compares against the universe of vehicles, not just against rivals in its class.

Performance

Acceleration - 10
100%
Fuel Economy - 6
60%
Ride Quality - 4
40%
Steering/Handling - 10
100%
Quietness - 5
50%

Accommodations

Controls/Materials - 7
70%
Room/Comfort Front - 7
70%
Room/Comfort Rear - 1
10%
Cargo Room - 1
10%

Other

Value - 9
90%

Total: 60

Specifications

2-door convertible
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
96.5 176.8 71.2 51.3
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
4.4 16.9 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
NA NA NA NA
2-door convertible
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
96.5 177.4 74.0 50.9
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
NA 18.0 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
NA NA NA NA
2-door coupe
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
96.5 176.8 71.2 51.3
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
4.8 16.9 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
NA NA NA NA
2-door coupe
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
96.5 178.9 72.9 50.0
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
4.4 16.9 2
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
NA NA
2-door coupe
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
96.5 177.4 74.0 51.0
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
NA 18.0 4
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
NA NA NA NA
Safety Ratings

Model Tested: 2012 Not tested 2-door coupe

NHTSA

(5 is the highest rating)

Front Impact Test

Driver Injury - N/A
N/A0%
Front Passenger Injury - N/A
N/A0%

Side Impact Test

Driver Injury - N/A
N/A0%
Rear Passenger Injury - N/A
N/A0%

HLDI

(A score of 100 is average. Lower is better)

Collision N/A
Injury N/A
Theft N/A

Trouble Spots

Steering problems
Description: An error message “Fault Rear Steering Possible to Drive On” may appear after certain 2014 model Porsche 911 Turbo and Turbo S vehicles are started. The vehicle’s software must be reprogrammed to correct the situation. (2014)
Transmission problems
Description: Moisture may condense inside a vent line and enter the PDK transmission, resulting in error codes. (2013-14)

Recall History

2012 911 Carrera and Carrera S
Description: Certain 2012 model Porsche 911 Carrera and Carrera S vehicles made between May 31, 2011 and June 10, 2011 may have a mounting hole that is too small in diameter to correctly mount the seat belt anchor plate which may not allow the seat belt to adjust so it can properly fit an occupant.
2012 911 Carrera S
Description: Certain 2012 model Porsche 911 Carrera S vehicles made between October 26, 2011 and January 24, 2012 may have interference between a coolant line and a fuel line that can cause the fuel line to disconnect, resulting in a fuel leak.
2012-13 911 Carrera and Carrera 4
Description: Certain 2012 and 2013 model Porsche 911 Carrera and Carrera 4 vehicles with the standard exhaust system may have exhaust tail pipes that can break off of the muffler and fall onto the roadway.
2014 911
Description: Certain Porsche 911 vehicles made between May 7, 2014 and September 23, 2014 may be equipped with front hood upper lock assemblies that may fail to properly secure the hood when the car is being operated.
2014 911 GT3
Description: Certain 2014 model Porsche 911 GT3 vehicles made between October 19, 2013 and January 14, 2014 may have piston connecting rods that can come loose and damage the engine’s crankcase, causing an oil leak and fire risk. The affected vehicles require engine replacement.

Equipment Lists

Equipment lists are only viewable on larger screen sizes.

Pricing

Used-car pricing varies widely depending on local market conditions. Therefore, we recommend visiting websites that list used cars for sale to get a better idea of what a specific model is selling for in your area.