Compact car; Built in
  • 4-door sedan
  • transverse front-engine/front-wheel drive
Good condition price range: $8,200 – $15,300*


2014 Toyota Corolla


2014 Toyota Corolla


2014 Toyota Corolla


2014 Toyota Corolla

Pros:
  • Price
  • Rear-seat room
Cons:
  • Acceleration
  • Noise

Corolla retains a conservative, practical character that appeals to a broad range of compact-car shoppers who just wanted reliable transportation. There were plenty of compact cars that are more engaging and enjoyable to drive, and several that have more-upscale trimmings, but this mainstream Toyota’s unassuming personality and reputation for reliability still attracts many buyers.

Overview

Toyota’s compact car was redesigned for 2014. The Corolla rode a chassis that was 3.9 inches longer in wheelbase and 2.5 inches longer overall, and it gained expected new infotainment features such as a touchscreen audio system that was available with Toyota’s Entune app suite. LED headlights, a feature that’s typically found on luxury cars and SUVs, were standard on all models. All Corolla models used a 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine. Output was 132 horsepower in the L, LE, and S and 140 in the LE Eco. A 6-speed manual transmission was standard on the L and S. A 4-speed automatic was optional on the L. Optional on the S and standard on the LE and LE Eco was a continuously variable transmission (CVT) that behaved like an automatic. The CVT in the LE Eco had an “ECO” mode that softened throttle response in order to improve fuel economy. S models with the CVT offered a “Sport” setting and made the throttle more sensitive to benefit off-the-line acceleration.

The new styling was a bit more dynamic inside and out compared to the previous generation, though that’s not saying much. The Corolla’s primary rivals included the Chevrolet Cruze, Dodge Dart, Ford Focus, Honda Civic Sedan, Hyundai Elantra, Kia Forte, Mazda 3, and Nissan Sentra.

The Toyota Corolla included the usual roundup of safety equipment expected by shoppers and mandated by the government.

Yearly Updates

2015 Corolla
After its redesign for 2014, the Toyota Corolla saw minor standard-equipment updates for 2015. Premium models got the Driver Convenience package (which included a sunroof, navigation system, and upgraded audio system) as standard, along with a fold-down rear-seat armrest with two cupholders.

Engines

transverse front-engine/front-wheel drive

All Corolla models used a 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine. Output was 132 horsepower in the L, LE, and S and 140 in the LE Eco. A 6-speed manual transmission was standard on the L and S. A 4-speed automatic was optional on the L. Optional on the S and standard on the LE and LE Eco was a continuously variable transmission (CVT) that behaves like an automatic.

dohc I4
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 1.8/110
Engine HP 132
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 128
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
6-speed manual
4-speed automatic
CVT automatic
28/37
29/37
29/38
27
dohc I4
Engine Size (liters/cubic inches) 1.8/110
Engine HP 140
Engine Torque (lb-ft) 126
Avail. Trans. EPA MPG (city/hwy) MPG avg. as tested
CVT automatic 30/42

Road Test

The 132-horsepower 1.8-liter 4-cylinder engine that powered CG’s mid-level LE Plus test car was not new, but the automaticlike continuously variable transmission (CVT) is and it worked quite well. Unlike most CVTs, Toyota’s uses an internal 2-speed gearbox that backs the CVT part, giving it essentially a Low and High range. The benefit is not only a wider ratio spread, but also instant kickdown response, as the transmission simply drops from High range down to Low when you stab the throttle. This was one of my favorite features of the Corolla. On the down side, the combination didn’t provide a very lively takeoff from a stop.

In Consumer Guide testing, a Corolla LE Plus with CVT averaged 26.6 mpg over 349 miles with a mix of 60% city and 40% highway driving.

Ride is about average when the streets are as well, but cracks and bumps can pack a punch that the front-strut/rear-torsion-beam suspension doesn’t take so well.

Handling was characterized by light steering and modest body lean in turns. Not cushy luxury, not flingably sporty, just … eh.

Anything but leisurely acceleration was accompanied by a loud, buzzy—and steady—moan from the engine. Not something that gives the impression of “quality.” Speaking of noise, that generated by road and wind on the highway has drawn some criticism, but I didn’t notice it being overtly obnoxious.

Controls are legible and generally easy to use. The climate system uses a rotating knob to dial in temperature, however fan speed and mode were controlled by tedious, repetitive-step pushbuttons. The radio was simple to program through the 6.1-inch touchscreen.

Toyota has created a nice interior environment for the Corolla. Many surfaces in the test car were soft to the touch or even padded a little, and there was some tonal variety on the door panels and cloth seats.

Front seats had a nice bit of bolstering for grip, but could do with a bit more lower-back support. This sub-6-foot driver had all the leg room and head room he wanted behind the wheel. Visibility is a mixed bag. On the positive side, thin roof pillars give a far better all-around view than in most vehicles, something I really appreciate. Nearly all cars these days have a high trunk, which makes backing a trick, and while Corolla commendably comes standard with a wide-angle rearview camera, it didn’t work as well as most. Furthermore, the sun visors didn’t extend and didn’t come close to covering the side windows, which seems just a bit cut-rate.

Rear seats will accommodate three familiar adults, helped out by an extremely minimal central tunnel. Leg and head room are good—in fact, stretch-out room in back is surprising.

The squarish trunk is ample for a small car, though the load floor narrows between body structures ahead of the wheel houses. Liftover is pretty low for easy loading. Rear seats fold for added capacity, but they don’t fold flat and sit a few inches higher than the trunk floor.

Ratings

Model Tested: 2014 Corolla LE Plus CVT

Ratings values are on a 1-10 scale, with 10 being the best. With the exception of Value, these numbers reflect how the vehicle compares against the universe of vehicles, not just against rivals in its class.

Performance

Acceleration - 3
30%
Fuel Economy - 7
70%
Ride Quality - 5
50%
Steering/Handling - 5
50%
Quietness - 4
40%

Accommodations

Controls/Materials - 6
60%
Room/Comfort Front - 6
60%
Room/Comfort Rear - 6
60%
Cargo Room - 3
30%

Other

Value - 6
60%

Total: 51

Specifications

4-door sedan
Wheelbase (in.) Length (in.) Width (in.) Height (in.) Weight (lbs)
106.3 182.6 69.9 57.3 2800
Cargo Volume (cu/ft) Payload Capacity (cu/ft) Fuel Capacity (gal.) Seating Capacity
13.0 13.2 5.0
Headroom Legroom
Front Rear Front Rear
38.3 37.1 42.3 41.4
Safety Ratings

Model Tested: 2014 Corolla 4-door sedan

NHTSA

(5 is the highest rating)

Front Impact Test

Driver Injury - 5
100%
Front Passenger Injury - 4
80%

Side Impact Test

Driver Injury - 5
100%
Rear Passenger Injury - 5
100%

Trouble Spots

None
Description: None to date

Recall History

2014 Corolla
Description: The windshield wiper may short circuit and the wipers would be inoperable.

Equipment Lists

Equipment lists are only viewable on larger screen sizes.

Pricing

Used-car pricing varies widely depending on local market conditions. Therefore, we recommend visiting websites that list used cars for sale to get a better idea of what a specific model is selling for in your area.